Voter Help Desk
Overseas Vote
As a uniformed services member, spouse or dependent, how do I determine my legal residence address for voting purposes?
 

Uniformed Service personnel and their family members must meet a state's residency requirements to declare it as their legal voting residence. You must have had physical presence in the state with the intent to remain or make the state your home or domicile. At the bottom of this page is a list of residency requirements for each U.S. state.

You may only have one single legal residence at a time. You may change residency each time you transfer to a new location if you make a conscious decision to change residency:

Certain specific actions on your part may be interpreted as conscious decisions, e.g., registering to vote, registering a car, qualifying for in-state tuition, obtaining a driver's license, etc. Once your legal voting residence is changed, you may not revert to the previous residence address for voting without re-establishing physical presence and the intent to remain or return.

"Home of Record" is the address that you, as a military member, had upon entry into the Service and does not change.

Home of Record is not necessarily your legal voting residence, but they may be the same if you did not establish a legal voting residence elsewhere after entering on active duty.

If you, as a military member change your legal voting residence after entering on active duty, you may not revert to claiming the "Home of Record" as legal voting residence without re-establishing physical presence and intent to remain in or return to that state.

Voting age family members of active duty military personnel may each have a different legal residence. A spouse does not automatically assume the legal residence of the active duty member upon marriage.

Each individual must meet the physical presence and intent to remain or return criteria. Minors typically assume the legal residence of either parent when they become 18. They also have the option of establishing their own legal residence which can be different from either parent, assuming they have met the guidelines of physical presence and intent to remain or return.

 

STATE

DURATIONAL RESIDENCY RULES

Alabama

none

Alaska

none

Arizona

29 days of residency prior to an election

Arkansas

none

California

none

Colorado

22 days of residency prior to an election

Connecticut

none

Delaware

none

Florida

none

Georgia

none

Hawaii

none

Idaho

30 days of residency prior to an election

Illinois

30 days of residency prior to an election

Indiana

30 days of residency prior to an election

Iowa

none

Kansas

none

Kentucky

28 days of residency prior to an election

Louisiana

none

Maine

none

Maryland

none

Massachusetts 

none

Michigan

30 days of residency prior to an election

Minnesota

20 days of residency prior to an election

Mississippi

30 days of residency prior to an election

Missouri

none

Montana

30 days of residency prior to an election

Nebraska

none

Nevada

30 days of residency prior to an election

New Hampshire

none

New Jersey

30 days of residency prior to an election

New Mexico

none

New York

30 days of residency prior to an election

North Carolina

30 days of residency prior to an election

North Dakota

30 days of residency prior to an election

Ohio

30 days of residency immediately prior to an election

Oklahoma

none

Oregon

none

Pennsylvania

30 days of residency prior to an election

Rhode Island

30 days of residency prior to an election

South Carolina

none

South Dakota

none

Tennessee

none

Texas

none

Utah

30 days of residency prior to an election

Vermont 

none

Virginia

none

Washington

30 days of residency prior to an election

Washington D.C.

30 days of residency prior to an election

West Virginia

none

Wisconsin 

10 days of residency prior to an election

Wyoming

none

 

Choose another category: